Judy Moore - Barrett Sotheby's International Realty



Posted by Judy Moore on 1/12/2020

It’s never too early or too late to start encouraging your children to explore new things and learn new skills. Children will spend most of their time at home, playing with various toys, and learning from their families.

 One way we can encourage kids to learn is to create a positive learning environment within our homes.

 Doing so doesn’t have to be an expensive or time-consuming project. There are many ways you can integrate fun learning experiences into your child’s daily life at home.

 In this article, we’re going to cover some of the cheap and simple ways to create a positive learning environment right at home so that you can build upon what they have learned (or what they will be learning soon) at school.

 Reading

It may come as no surprise that kids who read frequently are statistically more likely to excel at school. However, that doesn’t mean you just need to sit them down with a copy of Hamlet and wait for their Ivy League acceptance letter.

Reading can be an important way to learn and bond together with their child. The best way to encourage them to read is to read together the books that you’ll both enjoy.

Slowly building a home library or bookshelf is a fun way to visualize your hard work and all of the books you’ve read together. The best part is that you kind find countless used children's books for less than a dollar at your local thrift store.

Let your child take the lead

Creativity is something that is fostered and taught. Children are lucky to have active imaginations that let them make up games and stories on their own. However, you can help steer that creativity into fun projects at home that will produce something they can be proud of.

A good way to do this is to let your children direct you in the direction of their interests. If they ask you, “Can I try?” while you’re mixing cake batter, you’d often be surprised at how capable they are. Getting them involved doesn’t have to mean spending hundreds on a chemistry set that will be used just once--find ways they can help with projects that exist already around your house.

Be a mentor

Parenting is full-time work. It can be hard to find time to spend learning with children after a full day of work and cooking dinner, and it’s tempting to spend the rest of the night binge-watching Netflix shows. However, it’s possible to relax while still setting a good example for your child.

Watching science shows or nature documentaries together can help you both learn something new. Making trips to museums or growing a garden together on the weekends are other ways you can learn new things and skills and have fun with your children at the same time.

When it comes to food, eating healthy, home-cooked meals and nutritious snacks can be a way for both of you to improve your health and learn the benefits of nutrition.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Judy Moore on 1/5/2020

Image by Suphaksorn Thongwongboot from Shutterstock

When relocating to a new home, you’ll need to plan to pack, hire movers, and to change your address with the post office but don’t forget to update your car insurance. If you’re moving to a new state or just to a new zip code, you will have to make some changes to your insurance to ensure you’re covered at your new residence.

Do You Have to Change Your Car Insurance When You Move?

Each state, and sometimes counties and cities, set the requirements for auto insurance coverage. Some states require a higher level of accident coverage, while others may require a coverage lower than what you already have. You need to adjust your policy to suit the demand of the state. If your current coverage meets the requirements, your premiums may still change. 

Decide on an Insurance Provider

As soon as you are confident you will move, contact your insurance company to see if they conduct business in your new state. Ask your insurance agent about the rules of your prospective state and if you need to change your policy. Doing this early gives you enough time to make the necessary adjustments and have them in place for when you move. If the company you use does not operate in your new state, take some time to research your options. 

Insurance costs vary from one carrier to the next because each company emphasizes different factors that might affect your vehicle in your new location. If you need to change your current insurance company, plan to compare prices and policies from at least three different carriers before deciding on which provider you want.

No-Fault Coverage

Some states in the US require car owners to have "no-fault" insurance coverage. No-fault coverage means that a car owner's insurance company covers any loss, medical bill, or funeral expenses caused by a car accident irrespective of whose fault the accident was (yours or the other driver). You have to find out if your new state has such a law so that you can put the required coverage in place.

Insurance Premiums

Insurance companies factor the chances of various events occurring before determining your premium. Relocating to another state might increase or decrease the likelihood of you making a claim due to theft, vandalism, or accidents. If you move from a small town to a larger city, it is likely your payments will increase. 

For more clarification on your car insurance, speak to an agent in your insurance company before the day of the move. Your realtor can recommend the best options for you to choose from in your new location, so add that to your talking points for the next meeting.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Judy Moore on 12/29/2019

Applying for a mortgage can be a lengthy and difficult process. Lenders want to know that they are going to get a return on their investment.

To ensure that they’ll see that positive return they will take a number of things into consideration, such as your income, credit score, employment history, and financial capital.

First-time homeowners often struggle when it comes to these prerequisites since they have fewer years of numbers for lenders to consider. If you’re one of those people, don’t worry--you can still purchase a home.

First-time homeowner loans, which are guaranteed by the U.S. government, and a number of private loans enable people to borrow money for a home without paying a huge down payment or having a vast credit history.

One downfall of said loans is private mortgage insurance, or “PMI.”

In this article, we’re going to talk about what private mortgage insurance is, how to avoid it, and how to get rid of it. 

What is PMI?

If you make a down payment on a mortgage that is less than 20% of the loan amount, you will most likely have to pay private mortgage insurance.

PMI exists as a way for lenders to help guarantee they won’t lose money off of your loan. If you make a down payment of 20% or more, then lenders are typically satisfied that they won’t lose money from doing business with you.

PMI is not to be confused with home insurance, which protects you against damage and theft. Rather, it is an additional fee you’ll pay to your lender each month that is added to your mortgage payment.

PMI is calculated based on a few considerations. Lenders will take into account your down payment amount, the value of the mortgage, and your credit score.

In terms of costs, PMI typically costs between .5 and 1% of the total mortgage amount each year.

Avoiding PMI

Naturally, it’s best to avoid paying private mortgage insurance altogether. Private mortgage insurance has no future value for you and your family since it doesn’t count towards building equity and doesn’t protect you from any potential financial harm (your lender is the sole beneficiary of PMI).

Saving for a down payment can take time, and sometimes you’ll need to rent or cut costs while you save. However, if you do take on a loan with PMI, you can still cancel it at a later point.

Canceling your private mortgage insurance

The first thing you should know about canceling PMI is that it usually isn’t easy. You’ll need pay off at least 20% of the home, write a letter to your lender, and wait for an appraisal of the home. Once you’ve done this, you still have to wait while your lender considers your request. In all, this process could take months--months that you’re still required to pay PMI.

Once common way to get out of PMI is to refinance. If the value of your home has increased since the time of you taking on the loan, the new lender likely won’t require PMI. However, you’ll want to make sure that refinancing will get you a lower interest rate and cover the costs of refinancing. 




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Judy Moore on 12/24/2019

This Single-Family in Sudbury, MA recently sold for $715,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Judy Moore - Barrett Sotheby's International Realty.


38 Willard Grant Road, Sudbury, MA 01776

Single-Family

$734,900
Price
$715,000
Sale Price

11
Rooms
4
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Welcome! Abundant space! Expanded 4 BR, 2.5 BA Colonial in an appealing North Sudbury location! Featuring 3,364 SF of flexible living areas including a flowing open floor plan featuring space for all, gleaming HW floors, oversized kitchen w/new granite countertops, island, some newer appliances & views of tranquil backyard w/waterfall frog/fish pond, patio & walking trails. Enjoy LR w/fireplace, office w/built-ins, generous DR w/French Doors, handy den leading to inviting FR w/wood burning stove, mud room to outside deck & 4 BRS on the 2nd floor including MBR w/bath. Additionally the lower level walkout has a terrific game room for even more fun. Recent updates include: kitchen granite countertops, double ovens, dishwasher, refrigerator, high efficiency gas boiler, Superstor hot water, re-painted exterior and so much more. Numerous conveniences include CA, new back up generator, 3 car garage. Desirable loc less than 3 miles from the commuter rail and a short drive to Rt. 2. Welcome!

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Judy Moore on 12/22/2019

Photo by Taylor Simpson on Unsplash

Saving money with your décor can mean more than just finding a good deal on new couches. If you invest in decorative options that increase the efficiency of your home, you extend your savings. Proper insulation goes a long way but still, much of the energy loss in homes happens through the windows and walls. When shopping for decor, search for options that look great but also provide insulating properties for your space. An easy place to begin is with your windows.

Insulating window coverings work to keep your home cool in the warm months and warm during the colder months. They are widely available in a variety of styles and dimensions so you’re sure to find something that compliments your space.

Thermal drapes: The most common and least expensive option is thermal drapes or curtains. Thermal curtains are generally lightweight and the simplest option to install. Hanging them doesn't require the use of a stud-finder or high-end curtain rods, often a simple tension rod will suffice. 

Cellular shades: These shades are comprised of honeycomb-shaped cells that trap pockets of air within them, creating an insulating barrier between the outside and inside of your home. The more layers within the shade, the more protective the barrier. Cellular shades can include room darkening or blackout capabilities and are often cordless making them a good choice for households with children or pets.

Roman shades: Rather than the insulating air pockets utilized in cellular shades, roman shades use layers of fabric and other materials to create a thermal barrier. They can be a more decorative option because of the fabric component. You’ll find many DIY options available for creating this style. This is helpful if you want to personalize them with special fabric or if you need to fit them to a window that’s not a standard size.